The Tactical Traveler by Joe Brancatelli

Slowly, but Surely, We're Headed to Cuba
After more than 50 years of political isolation, commercial quarantine and partisan rancor, opening Cuba was never going to be fast or easy. From the moment President Obama announced his intention to normalize relations late in 2014, it's been a cautious, fraught and contentious process. Here's how we've covered the travel implications of the situation. The most recent item is at the top, of course. But read down for the full context.

JULY 7, 2016: YOU GET A HAVANA ROUTE! EVERYBODY GETS A HAVANA ROUTE!
The Transportation Department did today (July 7) what you could have easily predicted it would do: Carve up route rights to Havana among virtually all of the carriers capable of flying to the once-forbidden island. Alphabetically, Alaska Airlines was approved for daily Los Angeles flights. American Airlines gets four daily flights from its Miami hub and a daily flight from its Charlotte hub. Delta Air Lines also got a daily Miami route as well as flights from its Atlanta and New York/JFK hubs. JetBlue Airways also got a daily JFK run as well as flights from its Fort Lauderdale hub and from Orlando. Southwest Airlines also gets to fly from Fort Lauderdale as well as Tampa. United Airlines got a daily route from its Newark hub and a weekly flight from its Houston/Intercontinental hub. Even the low-fare/high-fee carriers, Frontier and Spirit airlines, got some routes. Although flights to other Cuban cities launch as early as September, don't expect the Havana runs to begin until late in the fall. When the flights get there, Starwood Hotels will already be entrenched. It has converted a Cuban military-run property into a 186-room Four Points hotel.

JUNE 16, 2016: NOBODY EXPECTED THE HAVANA ROUTES ....
The Transportation Department made the first route awards to Cuba last week, but no flights to Havana were included. American Airlines will fly from its Miami hub to four cities (Cienfuegos, Holguin, Camaguey and Varadero) starting on September 7. But the first commercial flights to Cuba in decades will launch on September 1 when commuter airline Silver Airways will fly from Fort Lauderdale to Santa Clara. It'll also add flights to other Cuban destinations in the fall. JetBlue Airways also won rights from Fort Lauderdale to Santa Clara, Camaguey and Holguin, but hasn't announced its schedule.

MARCH 17, 2016: HOW TO GET TO CUBA NOW? LIE ABOUT YOUR INTENTIONS
President Obama is headed to Cuba next week and it probably won't surprise you to learn that he's got travel and travel-related industry poohbahs in tow. Besides a contingent from AT&T, executives from Marriott and Starwood hotels will be there. The goal? Get mobile service running and get approval for Marriott and Starwood to open (or rebrand) hotels in Havana and elsewhere in Cuba. Marriott chief executive Arne Sorenson will also be there although he's officially traveling as vice chairman of the President's Export Council. Convenient, eh? Meanwhile, with U.S. carriers chomping at the proverbial bit to fly to Havana, the State, Commerce and Treasury departments this week made it much easier for U.S. citizens to travel. Although "tourism" remains officially against the rules, all an eager visitor need do is claim that a person-to-person trip is for "educational" purposes. As one expert on Cuba laws told the Los Angeles Times this week: "They've essentially deregulated travel. This is a standing invitation to travel to Cuba for U.S. tourists."

MARCH 3, 2016: EVERY AIRLINE WANTS TO FLY TO CUBA, SO LONG AS IT'S HAVANA
I warned you last month to slow down your thinking about flights to Cuba. This week we moved a small step forward as airlines were required to put in their bids for the 110 available flights to 10 destinations in Cuba. As expected, there was a rush of interest in flights to Havana and only a spotty desire to fly elsewhere on the island. Alaska Airlines wants to fly to the Cuban capital twice daily from Los Angeles. Delta wants daily flights from Atlanta, Orlando and New York/Kennedy as well as two daily flights from Miami. JetBlue Airways wants to operate flights from Boston, Newark, New York/JFK, Fort Lauderdale, Orlando and Tampa. Southwest seeks Havana flights from Fort Lauderdale, Orlando and Tampa. United Airlines made the smallest application, asking only for weekly flights from Chicago/O'Hare, Houston/Intercontinental and Washington/Dulles. It also wants daily flights from its Newark hub. There were also applications from Frontier Airlines, the commuter carrier Silver Airways and the revived Eastern Airlines. Only 20 daily flights to Havana will be approved by the Transportation Department and the winning routes aren't likely to occur until the summer.

JANUARY 28, 2016: STEP-BY-STEP, IT'S GETTING LESS DIFFICULT
Travel to Cuba continues to get less difficult. The U.S. Treasury Department this week liberalized many rules for business travel to--and doing business on--the island. Complete details are here.

DECEMBER 17, 2015: MAKING THE CUBAN CONNECTION
Let's be honest: Other than the fact that Cuba has been off-limits for U.S. travelers for more than 50 years, what's the appeal of going there? Some good music? The chimera of picking up a '57 Chevy cheap? Cuba's travel infrastructure is decrepit and it will be years before it meets even the minimum standards of some other Caribbean beach destinations. You can't even claim you expect to get there before the "tourist rush" because the rest of the world never stopped going to Cuba. Besides, Airbnb is already there. That's a sure sign that "unspoiled Cuba" has already been spoiled. Still, the future is bright and I'm sure there'll be plenty of demand for commercial flights between the United States and Cuba when they finally arrive. And now we have a solid time frame: about six months. Thanks to an agreement announced yesterday, the path is clear for scheduled air service to resume. But don't book your flights yet. It'll take months to get the details worked out. It looks as if 110 daily flights between the United States and Cuba will be part of the first tranche of commercial service. But only 20 will be to and from Havana. Service to nine other Cuban destinations will each get ten flights. It's hard to see a lot of profitable demand to most of those places. And, oh, yeah, even with commercial airline service, only a very few U.S. travelers will legally be allowed to visit Cuba. Until and unless the embargo is lifted by Congress, it'll still be tough to visit Cuba. Unless, of course, we ignore the law and the embargo--and won't that be an interesting and inflammatory political row in the middle of the 2016 presidential election?

This column is Copyright 2016 by Joe Brancatelli. JoeSentMe.com is Copyright 2016 by Joe Brancatelli. All rights reserved. All of the opinions and material in this column are the sole property and responsibility of Joe Brancatelli. This material may not be reproduced in any form without his express written permission.